Please note Eco Approach is the new home to all business clients click here to visit the site or Login

Everything you need to know about smart meters

smart meter

Smart meters are helping spread awareness about electricity and gas consumption and they can help with rising bills.

Unlike traditional meters they provide users with real-time updates, helping them be more conscious about their carbon footprint.

There is more complexity involved than meets the eye so here we reveal everything you need to know about these useful devices.

Smart meter models explained

Commercial landlords, housing associations, and councils hoping to help occupiers ought to consider smart meters.

But it’s worth gaining a firm understanding of the different types available before any device is installed. By contacting your energy supplier, you can find out which model you will receive during your free installation.

SMETS1 is the name for the first generation of smart meters. They operate with a sim card, just like your mobile, that uses the 3G mobile phone network to communicate with the energy supplier.

The issue here, which we all have experienced, is sim cards do not always provide a reliable network. For this reason, there are instances where they are unable to communicate with the energy company.

SMETS2, the more contemporary model that was created in 2018, does not rely on a sim card. Instead, they use a separate communications network which is more dependable. This newer model also automatically picks up readings when you switch providers.

Most large energy companies provide smart meters for their customers. More are expected to get added to the list of providers as the smart meter rollout deadline ends in 2025. Under this obligation, all gas and electricity suppliers must meet the installation targets.

How smart meters help reduce costs and carbon footprints

Over the course of the government rollout , these are estimated to generate £5.6 billion worth of savings among UK households.

Smart meters alone will not result in lower energy bills. This is dependent on the user and whether they choose to use it to their advantage.

These devices bring awareness to how much energy is being used. Some of these displays translate how much you are using to costs. This knowledge can motivate occupiers to pay more attention and actively cut down on how much energy they consume.

Precise usage rates

Smart meters provide energy suppliers and users with precise usage rates. Therefore, bills can no longer be over or underestimated. Furthermore, many even flag faults. For example, if an appliance is using much more energy than it should, the spike in usage could indicate it is faulty.

They can also enable the householder to use cheaper tariffs. With energy suppliers adamant to roll these out by 2025, many offer exclusive smart meter-only tariffs. These are exclusive to those who have smart meters.

Last but by no means least they form part of a smart grid. This is based on a system that is designed to provide energy efficiently as and when it is needed.

Commercial landlords, housing associations, and councils that provide houses that make use of these devices can help their occupiers with rising costs.

Here at PropCert we are a nationwide provider of property services including Energy Performance Certificates, Electrical Installation Condition Reports, Asbestos Surveys, Fire Risk Assessments and more.

For a full list of services please click here and contact us here for any more information on what we provide.

Related articles

Regular checks and tests must be conducted around the property to prevent a fire from occurring. These include gas safety checks, fire risk assessments, alarm checks, and electrical installation checks.
Regular checks and tests must be conducted around the property to prevent a fire from occurring. These include gas safety checks, fire risk assessments, alarm checks, and electrical installation checks.
Regular checks and tests must be conducted around the property to prevent a fire from occurring. These include gas safety checks, fire risk assessments, alarm checks, and electrical installation checks.